Author Archive

01/04/12

This contributor post was written by Katherine of Making Chicken Salad.

Sometimes I like a simple, inexpensive little craft to be able to sit down with to take a break from a busy day, and this project fits the bill nicely. It breaks down to less than $5 per necklace (depending on how fancy you get with your jewelery supplies–mine came from the craft section at Walmart) and once you have your materials assembled you can have a brand new necklace in 15 minutes or less. I have all of my supplies for this project sorted and stored in a muffin tin, and my son have been pulling it out of the cupboard every day for the past week for quick craft sessions.

Here are the materials you’ll need: 1. shrinky dink film 2. colored pencils (not water soluable) 3. small hole punch 4. small piece of twine or ribbon 5. necklace chain 6. jump rings and clasp for your necklace 7. needle nose pliers

Here is how you make it:

1. Take a profile photo of your child/husband/wife/dog, or whomever you would use for your necklace with your phone or digital camera. Make sure they are stading against a white or light background in a well-lit area.

2. You will be using your phone or camera screen as a mini mightbox to trace your image. With the rough side of the shrinky dink film facing UP, place it on the screen and gently trace the image outline with a sharp, black pencil. I found this much easier to do with a bit of blue painters tape holding the film in place.

3. Remove the film from your phone and color in your silhouette, and draw a cute little red heart.

4. Cut out your silhouette and heart, leaving a small border around the edge of each image. Punch a small hole near the top of each cutout.

5. Bake the shrinky dinks in a 250 degree (F) oven for approximately four minutes on a foil-lined metal cookie sheet. You will know they are done when they have completely flattened out and the edges are no longer curled. For even baking, place the baking sheet in the oven while it is preheating so that the shrinky dinks are heated evenly on both sides.

6. Remove the shrinky dinks from the oven and let cool while you gather your jewelery making supplies.

7. Attach one of your jump rings to the silhouette pendant, then slip it onto the necklace chain. Loop your twine or ribbon through the heart, then tie it to the pendant charm with a little bow. Finally, attach your final jump rings and clasp to each end of the chain and your project is done!

 

About Katherine: Katherine Jalaty lives in Northern California, where she spends her time taking care of her family and making things for her new home. Her blog, Making Chicken Salad: The Art of Something Out of Nothing, is where she shares DIY projects, recipes and bits of inspiration from her own life and from other artists. Keep up with her on the blog or on Twitter @katherinejalaty.

11/30/11

This contributor post was written by Katherine of Making Chicken Salad.

In my opinion there can never be enough of the following in our home: storage solutions and layers of pattern. These DIY ottomans are super easy and fulfill both of those criteria! And, at less than an hour put together they make a perfect Saturday morning project.

Here are the materials you will need: 1. Plain storage ottoman. For those pictured above I used one microfiber ottoman and one velvet one with rhinestone buttons–they were both pretty ugly to begin with but at less than $15 each they are perfect candidates for a makeover; 2. 2 yards of fabric; 3. piping in a contrasting color/pattern; 4. staple gun & plenty of staples; 5. upholstery tacks & a hammer; 6. either a sewing machine or a hand sewing needle and thread.

Here is how you make it:
1. Let’s start with the base of the ottoman. Use your otttoman as a pattern to trace and cut out your fabric. Do this by measuring the width of one side, then multiplying that measurement by four and adding six inches.

2. Place your ottoman on its side on the long piece of fabric and bring the edge up and over the top. Place a few staples to keep the fabric in place.

3. Tightly pull the other edge of the fabric around the ottoman, with the raw edge folded under. Pull the folded fabric right over the staples you placed. Nail one upholstery tack into the center of the edge, and then one in each corner, pulling the fabric taught as you go. Once the fabric is held securely in place, fill in the rest of the edge with tacks.

4. Flip the ottoman upside down so the bottom is facing up. Tuck the raw edges under and staple all of the way around. Depending on the style of your ottoman you can either tuck and staple around the feet, or loosen the feet and tuck the fabric underneath, as I did.

5. Stand the ottoman on its feet, right side up. Tuck the raw edges of the fabric under and fold over the top of the ottoman. Staple the fabric to the inside of the of the ottoman, all of the way around. The base is now finished & you are ready to move onto the lid.

6. Place the ottoman lid upside down on your work surface and slice all of the way around the edges so that you can easily peel the fabric off to use as a pattern. Cut one square center piece and four edge strips the exact same sizes as the pieces of the original lid covering.

7. Sandwich the piping in between the edges of the center piece and each of the edge pieces, and stitch around the perimeter of the fabric. Then, stitch the ends of each of the edge pieces together.

8. Place the new cover over the lid, fold the edges under, and staple all of the way around the inside edge of the lid. Your finished product will look much better if you are sure to keep the fabric taught as you go. And, you are done!

 

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About Katherine: Katherine Jalaty lives in Northern California, where she spends her time taking care of her family and making things for her new home. Her blog, Making Chicken Salad: The Art of Something Out of Nothing, is where she shares DIY projects, recipes and bits of inspiration from her own life and from other artists. Keep up with her on the blog or on Twitter @katherinejalaty.

10/26/11

This contributor post was written by Katherine of Making Chicken Salad. This is Katherine’s first post as a contributor here on pns and she is BRINGING IT today with her first tutorial. She’ll be writing monthly diy craft projects for you. Take it away Katherine…

I really love home decor that juxtaposes fancy and not-so-fancy elements. Recently I spotted a beautiful mercury glass lamp with a rustic burlap shade (and a high price tag!) and knew immediately that I wanted to make one of my own.

Here are the materials you’ll need: 1. clean, dry 1 gallon glass jug free of any labels or adhesive (mine is an apple cider jug from the grocery store) 2. bottle lamp kit 3. Krylon Metallic Silver spray paint 4. Extra-fine steel wool 5. burlap lamp shade (I used this shade in size small) 6. *optional: air-dry clay (only if the neck of your bottle is slightly wider than the lamp kit, as mine was)

Here is how you make it:

1. Take your bottle outside to a clean, well-ventilated area and spray it with one light coat of the silver spray paint. When spraying, make sure to hold the can about 12-14 inches from your bottle so that you apply only a light coat of paint. Its OK if you can still see the glass through the paint. The idea is to have a bottle that looks aged, not perfect!

2. After your paint is dry to the touch and no longer tacky, lightly rub the whole surface with extra-fine steel wool to smooth it out and remove small sections of paint.

3. Repeat steps 1. and 2. until you are satisfied. My lamp has three coats of paint. By applying multiple light coats (as opposed to one heavy one) your bottle will have a sparkly, aged texture–which is what we want!

4. Follow the instructions on your lamp kit to assemble and attach it to the bottle. This is where you may need a bit of air dry clay at the neck of the bottle to secure the rubber cork.

5. Insert a light bulb and test your lamp.

6. Once you have determined that everything is working properly add your lamp shade and enjoy your new lamp!

Like this tutorial? Help spread the word by sharing it on facebook, twitter, and stumbleupon using the handy buttons below.

About Katherine: Katherine Jalaty lives in Northern California, where she spends her time taking care of her family and making things for her new home. Her blog, Making Chicken Salad: The Art of Something Out of Nothing, is where she shares DIY projects, recipes and bits of inspiration from her own life and from other artists. Keep up with her on the blog or on Twitter @katherinejalaty.