A (DIY) Hanging Wall Organizer Pretty Enough to Take Pictures Of (But Still Functions Like a Champ)

This hanging wall organizer is the perfect way to keep important items handy, but still tucked away. AND it costs less than $20 to make! 

A (DIY) Hanging Wall Organizer Pretty Enough to Take Pictures Of (But Still Functions Like a Champ)

I’ve been desperately trying to get my workspace organized at home. But honestly, trying to find the balance of making that room look good, design-wise, AND truly organized has been a struggle.

So, I started brainstorming on organizational ideas that would 1) be budget-friendly 2) multi-functional and 3) not be an eye sore.

Ultimately, this DIY wall pocket organizer is what I landed on, and for me, it checks all the boxes. By the time this tutorial is published, I will have already been using it for two months! And can honestly say, its the best thing I’ve done for my office to date!

A (DIY) Hanging Wall Organizer Pretty Enough to Take Pictures Of (But Still Functions Like a Champ)

Hanging Wall Organizer DIY

Aside from the super functional design (and general style), my favorite thing about this canvas wall organizer is that you can make it for less than $20! The fact that you can make something this big AND this useful that takes up literally NO floor space for less than twenty bucks is honestly blowing my mind a little bit.

What can you use this hanging organizer for exactly?

Sooo many different things! But here are a few ideas:

  1. Use it to organize mail and bills, along with kid’s homework and other paper items.
  2. Use it for storing and organizing craft and office supplies, like I do with mine. I’m a little bias, but this is my favorite use case scenario, especially if you have a work from home office that needs to stay as clutter-free as possible.
  3. Hang it in your closet to store scarves, jewelry, and other accessories that you want to keep organized and in plain sight. You can even reconfigure the design to use more dowel rods and hang heels it.

So now that you have a better idea of what you can use this organizer for, here’s how to make one…

Materials for Hanging Wall Organizer

  • 6×9 canvas drop cloth*
  • gold grommet kit
  • one 1/2 inch dowel rod (cut down to a length of  22 inches)
  • sewing machine
  • measuring tape
  • pencil or tailors chalk
  • scissors
  • thread
  • s-hooks

*You will not need something roughly this large to recreate the same organizer, but that is a standard drop cloth size.

Using a Drop Cloth vs Raw (Artist) Canvas

Whether you use an inexpensive drop cloth or choose for a little bit higher quality raw canvas is up to you. But if you’re having trouble deciding, think about how often it’s going to be viewed.

If this wall organizer is going to hang in your closet or pantry and is strictly for utility purposes, definitely go with a drop cloth. It will be easier to get your hands on the material you need AND cost less.

BUT if you want a really pretty organizer that you can display and be happy looking at every day, you may want to go with raw canvas form an art supply store. It will be a little bit more money, but will still be a great price for what you’re getting in return.

I can’t really quote what the cost would be for raw canvas vs a drop cloth because canvas prices vary drastically from store to store and also vary by fabric weight.

If I were to take a guess though, on average, raw canvas in a medium to heavy weight will cost at least 50% more than drop cloth canvas. Which is actually, still a good price for what you’re getting. But cost is definitely something to consider.

Whether you go with a drop cloth or raw artist canvas though, make sure to get a medium or slightly heavier weight canvas. Super thin canvas isn’t the best option for this project because it will make it too floppy.

You want something sturdy and durable, so medium or heavyweight materials are going to be your best bets. You want something durable that can hold up to supplies being packed in, etc

Instructions for Hanging Wall Organizer

1. Measure and cut the following pieces:

  • A – 26″ x 48″
  • B / C – 7″ x 26″ (2 pieces this size total – one for B + one for C)
  • D – 5″ x 26″
  • E – 2″ x 31.5″
  • F – 2″ x 26″

2. Fold the tops of the pocket pieces 1/2″ in and press with a iron (B, C, D). Sew 1/4″ from the top the whole way across. Repeat with every pocket.

3. Take your E piece and fold 1/2″ in on both sides and press. Sew 1/4″ from the edges on both sides the whole way across.

4. Take A and B and pin along the bottom edges. Sew 1/2″ from the edge. Fold upward and press with your iron and pin the sides.

5. Measure 14″ from the top of the bottom pocket and mark with tailors chalk in 3 spaces (one in the middle, and one on each side). Take your D piece and measure 1/2″ in from the bottom edge and mark with tailors chalk in the same 3 spaces.

Match your markings with the top of the D piece facing the bottom of the organizer and the exterior of the pocket facing in so that when you flip it up, the outside will be showing.

6. Once pinned, use your tailors chalk to mark 1/2″ from the edge of the D pocket across the entire piece then sew along the line.

7. Flip the pocket upward, press with your iron, and pin the sides.

8. Measure 2″ from the top of the D pocket and repeat step 6-8 with the C piece.

9. Measure 3″ from the bottom of your D pocket (center pocket) and mark with tailors chalk on both sides of the A piece. Line up the top and edge of the E piece with the tailors chalk mark and pin your E piece right on the edge to the A piece.

Measure 2″ in from the edge and pin the E piece at the 2″ mark.

10. Time to make the loops for your tools!* For a larger loop to store hammers, mallets, and large brushes, measure 2.5″ from the 2″ pin and 3″ from the bottom of the D pocket and mark the A piece with tailor’s chalk at that spot.

Then, measure your E piece 3.5″ from the 2″ pin and mark with tailor’s chalk at the top of the piece. Match the mark on the E piece to the mark on the A piece and pin.

Measure 1″ from the pin, and add another pin (this is just to give your tools some breathing room. No need to make this a loop).

*Feel free to customize your loop sizes to the tools you’re storing.

11. Now, make a smaller loop for scissors, screwdrivers, or wrenches. Measure 2″ from the last pin and 3″ from the bottom of the D pocket and mark the A piece with tailors chalk at that spot.

Then, measure your E piece 2.5″ from the last pin and mark with tailor’s chalk at the top of the piece. Match the marks on the E and A pieces and pin. Measure 1″ from the pin, and pin again.

12. Repeat steps 11 and 12 alternating between the 2 sizes. You should have 4 large loops (step 11) and 3 smaller loops (step 12) at the end of it totaling 7 loops.

13. Once everything is pinned, sew vertical seams at every pin except for the two at either edge. Those will be folded in and sewn at the end.

14. We sewed the top stitch first since the dowel rod make things a bit harder to maneuver. Fold the unfinished short edge of the A piece 1″ and press and pin. Then, sew a seam 1/2″ from the edge. Easy enough!

15. Now its time to make the dowel rod bar at the top of your organizer. Take your F piece and fold 1″ on the top and 1/2″ on the bottom. Press and pin.

16. Before sewing, make sure your dowel rod can fit in the hole AND make sure the length of the dowel rod isn’t too long to hem the sides as you’ll be folding it over and hemming in the next step.

I left about 2″ worth of fabric on either end just in case, making the dowel come to be about 22″ in length, but test and make sure that length is good for you before proceeding.

Once you have a good length, you can create a ridge in the dowel with a pair of scissors by spinning the dowel while you have your scissors in the cutting position where you need to shorten your dowel to.

Once you do that, it should be easier to snap the dowel. You can trim off any access splinters with scissors too.

17. Once the length of the dowel is good, sew your F piece along the 1/2″ side with a seam 3/8″ from the edge. Slip your dowel in and set aside.

18. Measure 3″ from the top and mark on the left and right unfinished edges with tailors chalk. Take your finished F piece with the dowel inside and, with the dowel pointing upward, pin at the chalked marks.

19. Fold each edge of your A piece in 1″, pin, and sew everything together. Note that this is a LOT of fabric going through your machine so just take things slowly to ensure you get a straight stitch.

20. Time to sew your pockets! I sewed the bottom pocket (B) in 3 sections by measuring and marking 2 spots with tailors chalk at 8″, 16″. Mark and sew along those lines.

21. I split pocket D into 4 pockets by measuring and marking at 6″, 12″, and 18″. Mark and sew along those lines.

22. The last pocket (C) was sewn in half so measure and mark the center of the pocket (12″) and sew along the line.

23. Now that everything is sewn, you can add your grommets on top. I suggest you use 3 to support all the weight. Measure the length of your organizer and mark the center with tailors chalk.

Then, measure 2″ from the top and mark in the same center spot (this will be the bottom of the grommet).

Line up your grommet with the center and bottom mark and make an x where it’ll go. Cut that x to create a hole for the grommet.

24. Then, measure 2″ in from either side and 2″ down from the top. Mark all measurements with tailors chalk. These marks will be the bottom and inward side of the grommets.

Place the grommets at the marks and mark an x in the center of the grommet. Cut the x to create holes for the grommets.

25. Follow the grommet package instructions to add your grommets.

26. Find a good spot for your organizer, hang it, and fill it with all your goodies! We used s-hooks to hang scissors and tape on the dowel rod, but you can add some clamps to hang paper or use it for keys too. The possibilities of this organizer are endless!

How to make a canvas wall organizer that hangs on the wall, to hold craft supplies, office supplies, and more.

Organizing craft supplies in DIY wall organizer made of heavyweight canvas

How to make a huge canvas wall organizer that costs less than $20 to make.

DIY wall organizer made of canvas

How to make a huge canvas wall organizer that costs less than $20 to make.

Hanging Wall Organizer DIY

Aside from the super functional design (and general style), my favorite thing about this canvas wall organizer is that you can make it for less than $20! 
Keyword: canvas, diy apron, office, wall organizer
Cost: 20

Ingredients

  • 6x9 canvas drop cloth
  • gold grommet kit
  • one 1/2 inch dowel rod cut down to a length of  22 inches
  • sewing machine
  • measuring tape
  • pencil or tailors chalk
  • scissors
  • thread
  • s-hooks

Instructions

Measure and cut the following pieces:

  • A - 26" x 48"
  • B / C - 7" x 26" (2 pieces this size total - one for B + one for C)
  • D - 5" x 26"
  • E - 2" x 31.5"
  • F - 2" x 26"

Fold the tops of the pocket pieces 1/2" in and press with a iron (B, C, D). Sew 1/4" from the top the whole way across. Repeat with every pocket

    Take your E piece and fold 1/2" in on both sides and press. Sew 1/4" from the edges on both sides the whole way across.

      Take A and B and pin along the bottom edges. Sew 1/2" from the edge. Fold upward and press with your iron and pin the sides.

        Measure 14" from the top of the bottom pocket and mark with tailors chalk in 3 spaces (one in the middle, and one on each side). Take your D piece and measure 1/2" in from the bottom edge and mark with tailors chalk in the same 3 spaces.

        • Match your markings with the top of the D piece facing the bottom of the organizer and the exterior of the pocket facing in so that when you flip it up, the outside will be showing.

        Once pinned, use your tailors chalk to mark 1/2" from the edge of the D pocket across the entire piece then sew along the line.

          Flip the pocket upward, press with your iron, and pin the sides.

            Measure 2" from the top of the D pocket and repeat step 6-8 with the C piece.

              Measure 3" from the bottom of your D pocket (center pocket) and mark with tailors chalk on both sides of the A piece. Line up the top and edge of the E piece with the tailors chalk mark and pin your E piece right on the edge to the A piece. Measure 2" in from the edge and pin the E piece at the 2" mark.

                Time to make the loops for your tools!* For a larger loop to store hammers, mallets, and large brushes, measure 2.5" from the 2" pin and 3" from the bottom of the D pocket and mark the A piece with tailor's chalk at that spot.

                • Then, measure your E piece 3.5" from the 2" pin and mark with tailor's chalk at the top of the piece. Match the mark on the E piece to the mark on the A piece and pin. Measure 1" from the pin, and add another pin (this is just to give your tools some breathing room. No need to make this a loop).
                • *Feel free to customize your loop sizes to the tools you're storing.

                Now, make a smaller loop for scissors, screwdrivers, or wrenches. Measure 2" from the last pin and 3" from the bottom of the D pocket and mark the A piece with tailors chalk at that spot. Then, measure your E piece 2.5" from the last pin and mark with tailor's chalk at the top of the piece. Match the marks on the E and A pieces and pin. Measure 1" from the pin, and pin again.

                  Repeat steps 11 and 12 alternating between the 2 sizes. You should have 4 large loops (step 11) and 3 smaller loops (step 12) at the end of it totaling 7 loops.

                    Once everything is pinned, sew vertical seams at every pin except for the two at either edge. Those will be folded in and sewn at the end.

                      We sewed the top stitch first since the dowel rod make things a bit harder to maneuver. Fold the unfinished short edge of the A piece 1" and press and pin. Then, sew a seam 1/2" from the edge. Easy enough!

                        Now its time to make the dowel rod bar at the top of your organizer. Take your F piece and fold 1" on the top and 1/2" on the bottom. Press and pin.

                          Before sewing, make sure your dowel rod can fit in the hole AND make sure the length of the dowel rod isn't too long to hem the sides as you'll be folding it over and hemming in the next step. I left about 2" worth of fabric on either end just in case, making the dowel come to be about 22" in length, but test and make sure that length is good for you before proceeding.

                          • Once you have a good length, you can create a ridge in the dowel with a pair of scissors by spinning the dowel while you have your scissors in the cutting position where you need to shorten your dowel to. Once you do that, it should be easier to snap the dowel. You can trim off any access splinters with scissors too.

                          Once the length of the dowel is good, sew your F piece along the 1/2" side with a seam 3/8" from the edge. Slip your dowel in and set aside.

                            Measure 3" from the top and mark on the left and right unfinished edges with tailors chalk. Take your finished F piece with the dowel inside and, with the dowel pointing upward, pin at the chalked marks.

                              Fold each edge of your A piece in 1", pin, and sew everything together. Note that this is a LOT of fabric going through your machine so just take things slowly to ensure you get a straight stitch.

                                Time to sew your pockets! I sewed the bottom pocket (B) in 3 sections by measuring and marking 2 spots with tailors chalk at 8", 16". Mark and sew along those lines.

                                  I split pocket D into 4 pockets by measuring and marking at 6", 12", and 18". Mark and sew along those lines.

                                    The last pocket (C) was sewn in half so measure and mark the center of the pocket (12") and sew along the line.

                                      Now that everything is sewn, you can add your grommets on top. I suggest you use 3 to support all the weight. Measure the length of your organizer and mark the center with tailors chalk. Then, measure 2" from the top and mark in the same center spot (this will be the bottom of the grommet).

                                      • Line up your grommet with the center and bottom mark and make an x where it'll go. Cut that x to create a hole for the grommet.

                                      Then, measure 2" in from either side and 2" down from the top. Mark all measurements with tailors chalk. These marks will be the bottom and inward side of the grommets. Place the grommets at the marks and mark an x in the center of the grommet. Cut the x to create holes for the grommets.

                                        Follow the grommet package instructions to add your grommets.

                                          Find a good spot for your organizer, hang it, and fill it with all your goodies! We used s-hooks to hang scissors and tape on the dowel rod, but you can add some clamps to hang paper or use it for keys too. The possibilities of this organizer are endless!

                                            Tried this recipe?Mention @paperandstitch or tag #paperandstitch!

                                            Sewing by Casey Harper

                                            Photography Amelia Lawrence

                                            Think you might take a stab at this hanging wall organizer? If so, what are you going to use it for? Bills? Craft supplies? I’m curious to see how some of you utilize this wall organizer in your own spaces.

                                            Looking for some more organizing DIYs? Try this Wood DIY Peg Rail Organizer or these super cute DIY Wall Hooks.

                                            3 comments | Click here to reply

                                            This is so cute! I need to make one of these for my office!

                                            Paige
                                            http://thehappyflammily.com

                                            Paige Cassandra Flamm

                                            I’ve been pondering the idea of making a small closet organizer for my 2yo girl. Definitely inspired to try my hand at it after seeing this DIY!

                                            Estrella

                                            One of the finest writing I have read so far!

                                            Nippon
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